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The Scoop

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Indiana Chamber: EPA plan is ‘potentially devastating’

Statement as issued Monday by the Indiana Chamber of Commerce:

June 2, 2014 (INDIANAPOLIS) — “Potentially devastating to our state.” That’s how the Indiana Chamber of Commerce views President Obama’s announcement today regarding a new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulation to strictly limit carbon emissions from the nation’s existing coal-fired power plants. This latest proposal comes on the heels of a plan to put in place greater pollution controls for any new power plants.

“The President has left no doubt that he is mounting an all-out war against coal. Congress refused to bite on a climate change bill, so he’s spending his second term trying to legislate via the EPA,” says Indiana Chamber President and CEO Kevin Brinegar. “Smart, necessary regulations make sense, but that’s the opposite of what we have here; it’s entirely unreasonable given our nation’s energy needs.

“These EPA regulations also will barely even move the needle toward reducing carbon emissions (not even by 2% according to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Institute for 21st Century Energy), but they will deal a tangible blow to the national and state economies,” he concludes.

The Institute for 21st Century Energy predicts the regulations will result in a whopping $51 billion in annual economic losses through 2030. On top of that, some 224,000 Americans will lose their jobs and consumers will pay $289 billion more for electricity. Separately, the U.S. Department of Energy has estimated the electricity cost increase could be as much as 80%.

“Most Hoosier businesses and families can’t afford to pay that, and they certainly can’t afford a slumping economy and job market,” Brinegar notes.

“The reality is that Indiana will be hit far harder than most states because it’s the number one per capita manufacturing state in the nation. Over 80% of Indiana’s electric power comes from coal, compared to only 45% for the country. Despite diversification efforts, coal remains Indiana’s primary energy source.”

For decades, companies that have located in Indiana have often cited a reliable and affordable supply of electricity among the determining factors, according to site selectors and information gathered by state government. Brinegar says “losing that competitive advantage entirely is now a real possibility with coal coming under attack by the Obama administration.”

Having affordable energy is among the goals in the Indiana Chamber’s long-term economic development plan Indiana Vision 2025 (www.indianachamber.com/2025).

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