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Associated Press
Teaching assistant Margarita Sokolova, second from left, helps Giuliana Zautta, 17, during a Girls Who Code class at Adobe Systems in San Jose, Calif.

Wanted: Girls who long to be geeks

Gender disparity in computer sciences

– Diana Navarro loves to code, and she’s not afraid to admit it.

But the 18-year-old Rutgers University computer science major knows she’s an anomaly: Writing software to run computer programs in 2014 is – more than ever – a man’s world.

“We live in a culture where we’re dissuaded to do things that are technical,” Navarro said. “Younger girls see men, not women, doing all the techie stuff, programming and computer science.”

Less than 1 percent of high school girls think of computer science as part of their future, even though it’s one of the fastest-growing fields in the U.S. today with a projected 4.2 million jobs by 2020, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Google, with a driverless car and Web-surfing eyeglasses under its belt, this week gave The Associated Press an early look at how it’s trying to change the gender disparity in its own workforce, and in the pipeline of potential workers, by launching a campaign Thursday called “Made with Code.”

The initiative begins with an introductory video of girls – silly, serious and brave – meeting President Barack Obama, painting over graffiti and goofing around.

The narrator says: “You are a girl who understands bits exist to be assembled. When you learn to code, you can assemble anything that you see missing. And in so doing, you will fix something, or change something, or invent something, or run something, and maybe that’s how you will play your bit in this world.”

A website features female role-model techies who write software to design cool fabrics or choreograph dances. There are simple, fun coding lessons and a directory of coding programs for girls.

The search giant is also offering $50 million in grants and partnering with Girls Who Code, a nonprofit launched in 2012 that runs summer coding institutes for girls, including the one that helped focus Navarro’s passion for technology.

A test run of Google’s online coding lessons this week was a hit with Carmen Ramirez y Porter, 11.

“It’s not very complicated,” she said. “It’s really cool to see how it turns out when you finish.”

Female participation in computer sciences has dropped to 18 percent, down from 37 percent in the 1980s, and only 7 percent of U.S. venture capital deals go to female founders and CEOs.

Just 20 percent of the 30,000 students who took the Advanced Placement computer science test last year were girls, according to a College Board analysis, which showed that no girls at all took the test in Mississippi, Montana or Wyoming.

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