You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

U.S.

  • Alaska pot backer ordered to comply with subpoena
    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A campaign-finance investigation is moving forward against an Alaska television reporter who quit her job on-air and vowed to work toward legalizing marijuana.
  • Ginsburg back at home, expected at court next week
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has returned home after undergoing an operation to implant a heart stent to clear a blocked artery and is expected to hear oral arguments on Monday.
  • Immigrants' chances tied to their state's polices
    PHOENIX (AP) — If Christian Avila lived a few hundred miles to the west, he would have a driver's license, qualify for in-state college tuition and a host of other opportunities available to young people granted legal status by President
Advertisement

Remains of ancient child reburied in Montana

WILSALL, Mont. – The 12,600-year-old remains of an infant boy were reburied Saturday in a Native American ceremony after scientists recovered DNA from the child discovered in central Montana in 1968.

The boy’s remains were put back as close as possible to the original burial site. Two film crews, about 30 American Indian tribal representatives from Montana and Washington, and others attended the reburial ceremony, The Billings Gazette reported.

“I hope that this is the final closure for you, too, as it is for us,” said Crow tribal elder Thomas Larson Medicine Horse Sr., addressing the family on whose property the child was found.

The DNA taken from the boy provided new indications of the ancient roots of today’s American Indians and other native people of the Americas. It was the oldest genome ever recovered from the New World and proved he was closely related to indigenous Americans.

The boy was between 1 and 1 1/2 years old when he died of an unknown cause. Artifacts found with the body show the boy was part of the Clovis culture, which existed in North America from about 13,000 years ago to about 12,600 years ago and is named for an archaeological site near Clovis, New Mexico.

The DNA also indicates the boy’s ancestors came from Asia, supporting the standard idea of ancient migration to the Americas by way of a land bridge that disappeared long ago.

During the ceremony, Francis Auld, a member of the Salish Kootenai tribe, decried the removal of the remains.

“I can partially agree with the science, if it would benefit the Indian nation,” he said, adding that American Indians have long suffered from the loss of their traditions, language and way of life.

But he ended on a more positive note.

“We’re all in it together today,” he said. “Keep that in your hearts as we go forward here.”

Advertisement