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Colleges

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NCAA president suggests system changes

– NCAA President Mark Emmert told a Senate committee Wednesday he supports “scholarships for life” and other reforms in how athletes are treated, then did such a good job of casting himself as a powerless figurehead that one senator told him: “I can’t tell whether you’re in charge or whether you’re a minion.”

Emmert faced a skeptical Senate Commerce Committee and said he feels college sports “works extremely well for the vast majority” and the overall current model of amateurism should be preserved.

But he listed changes he’d like to see enacted.

In addition to the end of the year-to-year scholarships, he said scholarships should also cover the full cost of attending college, not just basics such as room and board.

He also called for better health, safety and insurance protocols and said universities must confront what he called the “national crisis” of sexual assault.

Emmert said such changes could come about if Division I schools decide to remake their decision-making structure in the coming weeks, giving more authority to the five biggest conferences.

He reiterated that the schools themselves are in charge of the rules and emphasized the challenge of creating a consensus among college presidents, coaches and athletic directors.

That led to sharp words from Sen. Claire McCaskill, who leveled the “minion” statement and added: “If you’re merely a monetary pass-through, why should you even exist?”

The Missouri Democrat was particularly concerned with research that showed a significant percentage of universities allow athletic departments to handle sexual assault investigations of athletes.

Emmert said he was “equally surprised and dismayed by” McCaskill’s numbers and that he would work to put an end to the apparent conflict of interest.

The hearing comes as the NCAA faces pressure from multiple fronts to reform how athletes are treated.

The organization is awaiting a judge’s ruling following a three-week trial in Oakland, California, in which former UCLA basketball star Ed O’Bannon and others are seeking a share of revenues from the use of their names, images and likenesses in broadcasts and video games.

Emmert testified in the O’Bannon trial, where he opposed any effort to pay players because it would destroy the bedrock of amateurism on which college sports is based.

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