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Associated Press
In this March 21, 2001, file photo, Red Klotz, 80, owner of full-time Globetrotters' opponent the New York Nationals, smiles inside his office at his home

Basketball entrepreneur Louis 'Red' Klotz dies

MARGATE, N.J. — The basketball barnstormer who owned the Washington Generals and other teams that lost thousands of games to the Harlem Globetrotters has died. Louis "Red" Klotz was 93.

The Press of Atlantic City (http://bit.ly/1kVKk8R) reports Klotz died in his sleep Saturday at his home in Margate.

Klotz formed a working relationship with the Globetrotters in 1952, putting together the opposing teams that almost always lost. In 1971, he hit the game-winner in a rare Globetrotter loss as a 50-year-old player/coach.

In a statement posted on the Globetrotters website, team CEO Kurt Schneider said Klotz helped bring basketball and smiles to fans worldwide. He says Klotz was "a legend and a global treasure."

Klotz played on title-winning basketball teams in high school and an undefeated college team before playing one season with the championship-winning Baltimore Bullets in 1948.

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