You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Schools

  • Indiana Tech appoints dean for law school
    Indiana Tech Law School will have a new dean come January, school officials announced Tuesday. Charles P. Cercone, 56, currently the dean at Western Michigan University's Thomas M.
  • FWCS buys building for Anthis
    The Fort Wayne Community Schools board Monday approved the purchase of a building four blocks from the downtown Anthis Career Center. The building, at 125-129 Murray St.
  • FWCS buys building for Anthis
    The Fort Wayne Community Schools board Monday approved the purchase of a building four blocks from the downtown Anthis Career Center.The building, at 125-129 Murray St.
Advertisement
Ben Mikesell | The Journal Gazette
Fort Wayne Community Schools Superintendent Wendy Robinson talks to staff members from every school in the district Thursday at Memorial Coliseum.

FWCS kicks off 2014-15 with rally

They were told plenty of people were looking to tear them down, that they were in a war for the survival of public education and that they should be wary of politicians who haven’t seen the inside of a classroom in years.

And they were also called miracle workers.

They were told that their efforts are appreciated and noticed, and that those in power see what they do day in and day out and that none of it, no matter how small, goes unnoticed.

That was the pep-rally tone Thursday morning as Fort Wayne Com­munity Schools teachers and staff gathered at Memorial Coliseum to kick off the new school year. Students return to school Monday.

It was only the third time the district held such a gathering since Wendy Robinson took over as superintendent more than a decade ago.

District officials used the gathering to energize staff members after another year when school vouchers became more abundant and a new set of standards was given by the state, replacing the Common Core curriculum teachers previously taught.

“We have to do better this year than last year with even more restraints than last year,” Robinson told the crowd.

The new standards were approved in April, giving teachers and staff very little time to learn what they have to teach children and what order they have to teach it in.

Teachers were given workdays at the end of the last school year, were offered training throughout the summer and were going through more workdays leading up to the first day of school to make sure they are prepared for the new standards.

These new standards, though, share some similarities with Common Core, according to school officials.

The standards have set mathematical and English bench­marks for students, which will be measured by a statewide standardized test.

“It’s some added pressure for the teachers, but that’s pri­marily because they want to do what’s expected of them,” district spokeswoman Krista Stockman said regarding preparation for the new standards.

“So much is riding on the state test,” she said.

Still, they are close enough to previous standards that kids won’t be walk­ing into classrooms and “thinking, whoa, this is crazy!” Stockman said.

After hearing some rousing speeches from school board President Mark GiaQuinta, Robinson and board member Julia Hollingsworth, teachers filed out of the Coliseum Expo Center to the beats of Pharrell Williams’ “Happy,” ready to be bused back to their respective schools with another day to prepare their classrooms and for the new teaching standards.

Next week, the children will arrive.

“We’re as ready as we can be,” Stockman said.

jeffwiehe@jg.net They were told plenty of people were looking to tear them down, that they were in a war for the survival of public education and that they should be wary of politicians who haven’t seen the inside of a classroom in years.

And they were also called miracle workers.

They were told that their efforts are appreciated and noticed, and that those in power see what they do day in and day out and that none of it, no matter how small, goes unnoticed.

That was the pep rally tone at a gathering of Fort Wayne Community Schools teachers and staff at the Memorial Coliseum to kickoff the new school year Thursday morning. Students return to school on Monday.

It was only the third time the district held such a gathering since Wendy Robinson took over as superintendent more than a decade ago.

District officials used the gathering to energize staff after another year when school vouchers became more abundant and a new set of standards were given by the state, replacing the Common Core curriculum teachers previously taught.

“We have to do better this year than last year with even more restraints than last year,” said Robinson while speaking to the crowd.

The new standards were approved in April and gave teachers and staff very little time to learn what they have to teach children and what order they have to teach it in.

Teachers were given work days at the end of last year, offered training throughout the summer and were going through more work days leading up to the first day of school to make sure they were prepared for the new standards.

These new standards, though, share some similarities with Common Core, according to school officials.

The standards have set mathematical and English benchmarks for students, which will be measured by a statewide standardized test.

“It’s some added pressure for the teachers, but that’s primarily because they want to do what’s expected of them,” said Krista Stockman, district spokeswoman, on preparation for the new standards. “So much is riding on the state test.”

Still, they are close enough to previous standards that kids won’t be walking into classrooms and “thinking, whoa, this is crazy!” Stockman said.

After hearing some rousing speeches from school board president Mark GiaQuinta, Robinson and board member Julia Hollingsworth, teachers filed out of the Coliseum expo center to the beats of Pharrell Williams’ “Happy,” ready to be bused back to their respective schools with another day to prepare their classrooms and for the new teaching standards.

Next week, the children will be arriving.

“We’re as ready as we can be,” Stockman said.

jeffwiehe@jg.net

Advertisement