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The Journal Gazette

Wednesday, September 12, 2018 1:00 am

briefs

3 iPhone models to be unveiled

News services

SAN FRANCISCO – Apple is expected to unveil its biggest and most expensive iPhone today as part of a lineup of three new models aimed at widening the product's appeal amid slowing sales growth.

Most of the buzz is swirling around a rumored iPhone that is supposed to boast a 6.5-inch OLED screen, up from 5.8 inches on the existing iPhone X. OLED is a step up from traditional LCD technology.

An even-bigger iPhone would represent Apple's attempt to feed consumers' appetite for increasingly bigger screens as they rely on smartphones to watch and record video, as well as take photos wherever they are.

The iPhone X, a dramatically redesigned model released last fall, got rid of the home button and introduced facial-recognition technology to unlock the device. It was the first mass-market smartphone to demand a $1,000 starting price.

Small businesses upbeat, survey finds

A measure of optimism among U.S. small-business owners rose to a record and exceeded projections as companies planned the most capital spending since 2007 and hiring intentions hit an all-time high, a National Federation of Independent Business survey showed Tuesday.

Small businesses are increasingly optimistic as the economic expansion enters its 10th year and the Trump administration prioritizes industry deregulation and tax cuts. Companies have been boosting inventories to match robust consumer demand for goods and services.

“The small-business engine continues to roar with the dramatic change in economic policies since November 2016,” survey authors William Dunkelberg and Holly Wade said in the report.

While the gauge of intent to hire reached a record, finding qualified workers remains a problem. Of companies trying to fill a position in the month, 89 percent reported finding few or no qualified applicants. At the same time, reports of higher compensation were unchanged at a net 32 percent of firms.

Quitting workers, job ads reach high

U.S. employers advertised the most jobs on record in July, and the number of workers quitting their jobs also hit a new all-time high.

The Labor Department said Tuesday that the number of job openings rose 1.7 percent to 6.9 million, the most on record dating back to late 2000. The number of people quitting jumped 3 percent to 3.58 million, also a record. Quits are typically a good sign that jobs are plentiful, because people usually quit when they have another job or are confident they can find one.

With the unemployment rate at 3.9 percent, near an 18-year low, businesses are increasingly desperate to find workers.

Tesla drops 2 colors as it streamlines

Tesla is dropping two of the seven colors it had offered to customers as it tries to streamline production. In a tweet early Tuesday, CEO Elon Musk said obsidian black and metallic silver will still be available, but at a higher cost.

The company, based in Palo Alto, California, has struggled to vault from a niche maker of expensive electric cars into a mass-market automaker. It missed several deadlines to produce 5,000 of its mass-market Model 3 cars per week but reached that milestone earlier this summer.