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The Journal Gazette

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, photo, Kathy and Steve Dennis pull off the cover of their 1980's-era Apple II+ computer bought for their then young sons in Bellevue, Wash.  (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, photo, Kathy and Steve Dennis display their 1980's-era Apple II+ computer bought for their then young sons in Bellevue, Wash.  (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 29, 2018, photo, Kathy and Steve Dennis pose with a photo they took of some of their grandchildren and their phones, in Bellevue, Wash.  (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

  • FILE- In this Oct. 5, 1980, file photo, Nancy Armstrong, a teacher at the Marshall elementary school in Harrisburg, Pa., assists her students in the use of computers to aid them in their studies.  (AP Photo/Paul Vathis, File)

  • FILE- In this July 29, 1980, file photo, Greg Berman, 12, of Santa Barbara, Calif., sits at computer console at California Computer Camp near Santa Barbara.  (AP Photo/Hyman, File)

  • FILE- In this July 21, 1987, file photo, Carlos Tunnerman, 10, plays the "Contra" video game at an arcade in a Miami, Fla. (AP Photo/Joe Skipper, File)

Monday, September 03, 2018 11:10 am

From penny press to Snapchat: Parents fret through the ages

BARBARA ORTUTAY | Associated Press

NEW YORK – Adults have worried about the new types of media and technology their kids spend time with since the days of dime novels and rock n' roll.

There were concerns that the radio would pollute young minds, that fiction would confuse teenagers, that the TV would make them fat, that video games would cause real-life violence.

Even so, some experts – and grandparents – say there are key differences when it comes to smartphones. A big part of that is the highly customized, 24/7 presence our phones have in our lives, which makes them harder for parents to monitor and for kids to shut out.