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  • From the Sept. 10, 1916 picture page in The Journal Gazette (File): New buildings of General Electric works in course of construction on Wall street. Birdeye view taken from roof of office building looking northwest.

  • From the June 17, 1917 picture page in The Journal Gazette (File): New touring car of Dr. F. Schultz, which was wrecked at the corner of Fairfield avenue and Wayne street last Wednesday, when it skidded into a water works trench.

  • The June 10, 1917 picture page in The Journal Gazette (File)

  • From the June 17, 1917 picture page in The Journal Gazette (File): Jack Shea, four-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John P. Shea is the proud owner of a liberty bond.

  • The Sept. 10, 1916 picture page in The Journal Gazette. (File)

  • From the Sept. 10, 1916 picture page in The Journal Gazette (File): New buildings of General Electric works in course of construction on Wall street. Birdeye view taken from roof of office building looking southwest. 

  • From the Sept. 10, 1916 picture page in The Journal Gazette (File): Mrs. Catherine Reuille, 95 years old, and the oldest resident of Jefferson township and surrounding territory.

  • From the June 10, 1917 picture page in The Journal Gazette (File): Work of elevating and double tracking the Nickel Plate railroad through the eastern part of the city is progressing rapidly. This picture shows a view along the banks of the Maumee where stones and heavy rocks, many of which weighing a ton or more are being used in strengthening the high embankment of the elevated roadbed.

  • The June 17, 1917 picture page in The Journal Gazette (File)

Thursday, April 11, 2019 10:30 am

Early 1900s: Journal Gazette Picture Pages

COREY MCMAKEN | The Journal Gazette

The Journal Gazette has a staff of photographers that hits the streets every day to take pictures of breaking news, local milestones and community events – and plenty of pets and cute kids, too!

But 100 years ago, it wasn't so common to see photos in the newspaper. In fact, the front page was more likely to be full of text and maybe a sketch of a political leader or illustration of a major event. Most images in the newspaper were hand-drawn sketches, even for sporting events.

In the early 1900s, The Journal Gazette published a weekly page of pictures every Sunday. Anything from car accidents and construction projects to family reunions and fishermen showing off their catch (something you can still find on the Recreation page to this day).

The original copies of these photos are long since gone from our newsroom, so we are left with grainy images from microfilm scans of those pages. They aren't the best quality, but here are some photos from The Journal Gazette more than a century old.