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The Journal Gazette

Saturday, August 19, 2017 1:00 am

No work, no play

The key to a better relationship may not be in long walks on the beach or romantic dinners, it may actually be in discovering how your partner values chores.

According to recent studies, chores have a direct impact on relationships more than previously thought.

For example, a recent survey of 1,000 Americans age 18 and older, commissioned by home appliance leader LG Electronics, found 58 percent believe someone who's good at chores, like folding sheets, is also more likely to be better between the sheets.

Cleaning is caring

Would you feel more appreciated when your partner does household chores or buys you a gift? Among Americans with a live-in partner, nearly half (48 percent) would rather receive a free pass from chores for a month than designer jewelry or tickets to a big game (52 percent).

To improve your relationship with chores, consider delegating according to your priorities. For example, if one partner hates the sight of dishes in the sink while the other can't stand spots on the bathroom mirror, the sink-minder can load the dishwasher while the spot-hater takes care of wiping up the bathroom vanity. There's no better way to say “I love you” than a sink free of dishes and a spotless mirror.

Sorry with suds

Do you prefer to come home to a clean house after a feud rather than to a romantic dinner? Clean dishes, vacuumed floors and folded laundry are preferred over an apology by most Americans.

In fact, nearly 1 in 5 Americans would rather have a partner do household chores after a fight than apologize.

Good, clean flirting

Have you ever bragged to your partner about cleaning the bathroom or doing the dishes? Women (57 percent) are more likely than men (46 percent) to get turned on when their partner does a chore.

Couples should discuss division of housework and establish a plan for who will do what. Don't focus on a 50-50 split. Instead, emphasize working together as a team, and looking at chores as teamwork, rather than “your work” and “my work.” This can also be a way to spend time together while having some good, clean fun.

Payback is a dish

Have you ever purposely mixed your partner's laundry after a fight?

Surprisingly, you're not alone. One in 4 admit to messing up their partner's laundry intentionally when angry with their significant other.

While seeking revenge through household chores may seem like a relatively harmless way to express anger, try more constructive ways to communicate.

If your partner is one to leave dirty dishes in the sink as revenge, it's OK because loading the dishwasher is a breeze with appliances that can help, such as the LG QuadWash.

While every couple is unique, it turns out the love of shared chores is fairly common – and it may just be that housework is the true language of love.

– Brandpoint