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The Journal Gazette

  • Michelle Davies | The Journal Gazette A collection of items that were prevented from being taken onto aircraft carry-on bags at Fort Wayne International Airport.

  • Michelle Davies | The Journal Gazette Mike England, TSA Spokesperson, displays a collection of items that were stopped by officers, including a hand trowel, at Fort Wayne International Airport.

  • Michelle Davies | The Journal Gazette A collection of items that were prevented from being taken onto aircraft carry-on bags at Fort Wayne International Airport.

  • Michelle Davies | The Journal Gazette Mike England, TSA Spokesperson, displays a collection of items that were stopped by officers at Fort Wayne International Airport.

Tuesday, May 09, 2017 4:00 pm

TSA reminds travelers of carry-on policy

FRANK GRAY | The Journal Gazette

On a folding table near a security checkpoint at Fort Wayne International Airport Tuesday were displayed about 30 items: knives, hammers, souvenir baseball bats, what appeared to be a rolling pin, Leatherman tools.

The display represented a small sampling of items that flyers had to surrender at the airport in the prior 24 hours.

Mike England, a spokesman for the Transportation Security Administration, was there to remind people what they can and can't bring onto a plane in their carry-on luggage.

For years now anything that could be used as a weapon and containers with more than 3.4 ounces of liquid have been forbidden on planes. But people keep sticking the items in their carry-on luggage.

It's happening more and more, England says, primarily because as the economy improves, more people are flying, including some who seldom fly and don't know the rules.

The forbidden items do clog things up, slowing down the lines of people going through security, England says.

When a forbidden item is discovered in someone's carry on luggage, the passenger is given options. They can take it out to their car, put it in their check-in luggage, give it to a friend who's seeing them off or surrender it.

The check-in option is difficult because bags have already been checked, and taking an item to a car involves leaving the line and coming back and getting in the back of the line. Sometimes there's not time to do that.

Also, if someone is found with a knife with a blade 7 inches or longer, the police have to be called and the security checkpoint is closed, really clogging things up.

England said people who are flying who aren't sure of the rules can go to TSA.gov or even tweet the TSA at @asktsa and get a quick answer.

Also, certain items are banned in all luggage, including lithium ion batteries and anything explosive.

In all, passengers flying out of Fort Wayne have to surrender tens of thousands of pounds of items every year, England said. At large airports, it reaches hundreds of thousands of pounds.

The items are either given to charity or given to the state.

fgray@jg.net