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The Journal Gazette

  • Rachel Von | The Journal Gazette Solar panels are featured on the electronic car that the department is building at the College of Engineering at IPFW on Thursday. Charles McIntosh is only a senior in college but gave a paper at a prestigious electrical engineering conference and his paper was on the electronic car his department is building at IPFW.

  • Rachel Von | The Journal Gazette Portrait of Charles McIntosh with the electronic car that his department is building at the College of Engineering at IPFW on Thursday. Charles McIntosh is only a senior in college but gave a paper at a prestigious electrical engineering conference and his paper was on the electronic car his department is building at IPFW.

  • Rachel Von | The Journal Gazette Headshot of Charles McIntosh in front of power electronic equipment at the College of Engineering at IPFW on Thursday. Charles McIntosh is only a senior in college but gave a paper at a prestigious electrical engineering conference and his paper was on the electronic car his department is building at IPFW.

  • Rachel Von | The Journal Gazette Charles McIntosh poses in the electric car he and other students in IPFW’s College of Engineering, Technology and Computer Science are building. Standing is project adviser and professor Abdullah Eroglu.

  • Rachel Von | The Journal Gazette Portrait of Charles McIntosh with the electronic car that his department is building at the College of Engineering at IPFW on Thursday. Charles McIntosh is only a senior in college but gave a paper at a prestigious electrical engineering conference and his paper was on the electronic car his department is building at IPFW.

Monday, November 30, 2015 3:46 am

IPFW student leads electric car innovation

Jamie Duffy | The Journal Gazette

When Charles McIntosh visited IPFW with his parents, he really liked Fort Wayne a lot, he said.

"The people are great and if you’re an engineer, there’s a lot of opportunities," said McIntosh, 21, who came to the campus from Paulding, Ohio.

The oldest of 11 children, McIntosh was homeschooled by his mother, a nurse by training, who seemed quite at home teaching math and science. McIntosh is a senior now and has been the recipient of the Chancellor’s Distinguished Scholarship, also known as a free ride as far as tuition goes. He’s majoring in electrical engineering and already has accepted a position with Harris Corp., formerly Exelis.

Recently, McIntosh took the leadership position in delivering a paper to the 2015 Society for Design and Process Science Conference in Fort Worth, Texas. The paper, "Modeling Simulation and Implementation of an Electric Vehicle," is simple and straightforward, he said.

Under the guidance of professor Abdullah Eroglu, Ph.D., a group of electrical engineering students have been working on a prototype for an electric car, a hands-on experience that covers two semesters. The project was started by a team preceding the one in which McIntosh has taken a leadership role. Others will follow.

"The reason we need electric cars is that oil is not sustainable," McIntosh said. "If we start running out, there will be a huge rush to develop alternative fuel, and then (there will be) inefficiency. (There will be) a waste of money and resources and economic talent." 

Another reason is smog. "You know how China’s smog is? We want to make sure we take care of our world," McIntosh said.

The existing project phase cost $1,400, McIntosh said, a small price for a new prototype. Expected speed for the as-yet unnamed vehicle is 15 to 20 miles per hour. Sponsors include Indiana Michigan Power, NIPSCO, National Science Foundation, IPFW Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering.

With a professional paper under review, the university’s prestige will only grow. Other professors involved with the project are Dr. Hosni Abu-Mulaweh, professor of mechanical engineering, and Dr. Hossein Oloomi, professor of electrical engineering. Students in collaboration were Andres Cobos, Mitchell Eilerman, Leandra Lee, Austin Swihart and Joshua Weaver.

"Charles is doing great things," Eroglu said. The department is developing the technology but not thinking about selling it, he added.

"We are doing all the control system, joining the solar system," Eroglu said.

The car is self-charging through solar energy, McIntosh said.

When he’s not doing schoolwork, McIntosh likes to play soccer and volleyball and is a fan of novels by Frank Peretti and Jules Verne.

jduffy@jg.net


Mensa admissions

There will be a Mensa admissions test Saturday in Room 306 at First Presbyterian Church. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m., testing begins at 10 a.m.

The cost is $40, and photo ID is required. Test takers must be 14 or older. Walk-ins are welcome. For more information, contact Dan Klopfenstein at 260-710-0030.


Ivy Tech Community College Northeast

• The leaders of Indiana Wesleyan University and Ivy Tech Community College signed a agreement enabling Hoosier students to matriculate seamlessly from Ivy Tech’s early childhood education program to Indiana Wesleyan’s bachelor’s program in the same subject area. This program provides a single pathway for students who have earned their Associate of Science in early childhood education to move on to the Bachelor of Science in early childhood education at Indiana Wesleyan University. Through this program, all credits from Ivy Tech would transfer to Indiana Wesleyan.

• Lea Gamble, a building construction management student at Ivy Tech Community College Northeast, has received a $1,000 scholarship from Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society as a 2015 Coca-Cola Leaders of Promise Scholar. Gamble first took classes at Ivy Tech Northeast as a dual credit student at Huntington North High School. She became a full-time student in fall 2014. As a 2015 Coca-Cola Leader of Promise Scholar, Gamble is one of 207 Phi Theta Kappa members who have been awarded scholarships. Chosen from more than 1,100 applications worldwide, the $1,000 scholarships are for associate degree studies.


Indiana Tech

Dr. Joshua C. Francis, interim dean of Indiana Tech’s College of General Studies and director of teacher preparation, announced that Indiana Tech’s School of Education will begin offering a Bachelor of Science in special education for children who need mild to moderate intervention. 

Students can expect to receive a specialized curriculum and four full years of field experience that focuses on mild to moderate learning disabilities, developmental disorders and emotional or behavioral disorders. In addition, this program will prepare teachers to help students in grades K-12.


Holland Elementary

Holland Elementary schoolteachers Haylee Caywood, Jenna Driver, Dominique Barnes and Scott Mills received $500 gift cards to buy supplies or other items for their classroom from Towne House residents.

Students and parents who have a favorite teacher can nominate the individual for Teacher Honor Roll. Send nominations to The Journal Gazette, 600 W. Main St., Fort Wayne IN 46802; fax 461-8893 or email jduffy@jg.net.

To submit an item, send a typed release from the school or organization to Education Notebook, The Journal Gazette, 600 W. Main St., Fort Wayne IN 46802-0088; fax 461-8893 or email jduffy@jg.net at least two weeks before the desired publication date.