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The Journal Gazette

  • Associated Press Anti-North Korea protesters salute during a rally Saturday in Seoul, South Korea, ahead of a planned visit by President Donald Trump.

Sunday, November 05, 2017 1:00 am

Trump's Asian tour a crucial global test

12-day, 5-nation trip to centeron North Korea

Associated Press

Also: White House mocks Bushes for criticism

WASHINGTON – The White House on Saturday disparaged the legacies of the only two living Republican presidents to precede Donald Trump, after reports that both men castigated Trump in interviews last year and refused to vote for him.

Former President George H.W. Bush mocked then-candidate Trump as a “blowhard” and voted for a Democratic president, while the younger Bush worried aloud that Trump would destroy the idea of a Republican president in all but name, according to “The Last Republicans,” which is scheduled to go on sale this month.

“If one Presidential candidate can disassemble a political party, it speaks volumes about how strong a legacy its past two presidents really had,” the White House wrote to CNN. It called the younger Bush's decision to wage war on Iraq “one of the greatest foreign policy mistakes in American history.”

– Washington Post

FUSSA, Japan – President Donald Trump touched down in Japan early today, kicking off a grueling and consequential trip to Asia during which he'll exhort allies and rivals to step up efforts to counter the dangers posed by North Korea's nuclear threat.

Trump landed at Yokota Air Base on the outskirts of Tokyo, where he'll begin his trip with an address to American servicemembers. He'll then head to a private golf course for an informal lunch and golf with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

“It's going to be very positive and very historic,” Trump told reporters aboard Air Force One during the flight from Hawaii. “It's grueling, they tell me, but fortunately that's historically not been a problem for me. One thing you people will say, that's not been a problem.”

The 12-day, five-country trip, the longest Far East itinerary for a president in a generation, comes at a precarious moment for Trump. Just days ago, his former campaign chairman was indicted and another adviser pleaded guilty as part of an investigation into possible collusion between his 2016 campaign and Russian officials.

The trip presents a crucial international test for a president looking to reassure Asian allies worried that his inward-looking “America First” agenda could cede power in the region to China. They also are rattled by his bellicose rhetoric about North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. The North's growing missile arsenal threatens the capitals Trump will visit.

The trip will put Trump in face-to-face meetings with authoritarian leaders for whom he has expressed admiration. They include China's Xi Jinping, whom Trump has likened to “a king,” and the Philippines' Rodrigo Duterte, who has sanctioned the extrajudicial killings of drug dealers.

Trump may also have the chance for a second private audience with Russian President Vladimir Putin, on the sidelines of a summit in Vietnam. He told reporters that the meeting is “expected” to happen and that he “will want Putin's help” in dealing with the North Korea nuclear crisis. Trump and Putin could cross paths twice during the president's lengthy Asia trip: at a summit in Vietnam and later in the Philippines. It was unclear where they would meet.

Trump and Putin previously met along the sidelines of a summit in Europe this summer.

The White House is signaling that Trump will push American economic interests in the region, but the North Korean threat is expected to dominate the trip. One of Trump's two major speeches will come before the National Assembly in Seoul. Fiery threats against the North could resonate differently than they do from the distance of Washington.

Trump will forgo a trip to the Demilitarized Zone, the stark border between North and South Korea. All U.S. presidents except one since Ronald Reagan have visited the DMZ in a sign of solidarity with Seoul. The White House contends that Trump's commitment to South Korea is already crystal clear, as evidenced by his war of words with Kim and his threats to deliver “fire and fury” to North Korea if it does not stop threatening American allies.

At each stop, Trump will urge his hosts to squeeze North Korea by stopping trading with the North and sending home North Korean citizens working abroad. That includes China, which competes with the U.S. for influence in the region and provides much of North Korea's economic lifeblood.

The White House is banking on the close relationships Trump has established with some Asian leaders to help make his demands more palatable.

Officials acknowledge that Trump does not yet have a feel for Moon Jae-in, South Korea's newly elected liberal president. But Trump has demonstrated cordial relations with Xi and has struck up a friendship with Abe.

While Xi and Abe have recently tightened their control on power, Trump arrives weakened by low poll numbers, a stalled domestic agenda and the swirling Russia probe.

Many in the Asian capitals will view Trump warily. His early withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership demolished the Obama administration's effort to boost trade with some of the world's fastest-growing economies and sustain America's post-World War II strategic commitment to Asia.

Trump's trip will be the longest Asia visit for a U.S. president since George H.W. Bush visited in 1992, when he fell ill during a state dinner with Japan's prime minister.