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The Journal Gazette

  • Conyers

Wednesday, December 06, 2017 1:00 am

Conyers resigns, remains defiant

Sexual claims end long House career

Associated Press

DETROIT – Democratic Rep. John Conyers resigned from Congress on Tuesday after a nearly 53-year career, becoming the first Capitol Hill politician to lose his job in the torrent of sexual misconduct allegations sweeping through the nation's workplaces.

The 88-year-old civil rights leader and longest-serving member of the House announced what he referred to as his “retirement” on Detroit talk radio, while continuing to deny he groped or sexually harassed women who worked for him.

“My legacy can't be compromised or diminished in any way by what we're going through now,” said the congressman, who called into the radio show from the hospital where he was taken last week after complaining of lightheadedness. “This, too, shall pass. My legacy will continue through my children.”

He endorsed his son John Conyers III to succeed him.

Conyers, who was first elected in 1964 and went on to become a founding member in 1971 of the Congressional Black Caucus, easily won re-election last year to his 27th term in his heavily Democratic district in and around Detroit.

But after being publicly accused by one woman after another in recent weeks, he faced growing calls to resign from colleagues in the House, including Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi.

As the furor grew, he stepped down as the ranking Democrat on the House Judiciary Committee, and the Ethics Committee began investigating him.

It will be up to Republican Gov. Rick Snyder to set a date for a special election to pick someone to serve out the remaining year in Conyers' two-year term. State Sen. Ian Conyers, a grandson of Conyers' brother, said he plans to run for the seat.

On Monday, yet another allegation was lodged against Conyers, when a woman who said she worked for him for more than a decade, Elisa Grubbs, said he slid his hand up her skirt and rubbed her thighs while she was sitting next to him in the front row of a church.

Conyers said in a statement read Tuesday on the floor of the House that he was resigning “to preserve my legacy and good name.” He also complained that he was not being afforded due process to defend himself, and cited his health problems as another factor in his decision.

Conyers regularly won elections with more than 80 percent of the vote.

He co-sponsored a 1972 resolution recommending President Richard Nixon's impeachment for his conduct of the Vietnam War and regularly introduced a bill from 1989 onward to study the harm caused by slavery and the possibility of reparations to the descendants of slaves.

After a 15-year struggle, Conyers succeeded in establishing the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday as a federal holiday in 1986. He employed civil rights legend Rosa Parks at his Detroit district office for more than two decades.

“Congressman Conyers has served in the Congress for more than five decades, and shaped some of the most consequential legislation of the last half century,” Pelosi said after his retirement. “But no matter how great the legacy, it is no license to harass or discriminate. The brave women who came forward ... were owed the justice of this announcement.”