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The Journal Gazette

Thursday, December 03, 2015 6:16 am

Kennedy suspicion never fades

This month, the Museum of Broadcast Communications in Chicago is presenting a play that asserts the Chicago Mob had President John F. Kennedy killed in 1963. The play is said to present a strong chain of evidence. There also, of course, are books and dramatizations that contend the answer lies with the anti-Castro Cubans, the Cuban government, the Russian government or the CIA.

The biggest question is why, 52 years after the assassination, many people still question the official story presented by the Warren Commission in 1964.

Because things like this continue to emerge. An internal CIA report says John McCone, director of the agency at the time, participated in a coverup that hid possibly crucial facts from the commission.

The 2013 report says that McCone directed others at his agency to provide only "passive, reactive and selective" information to the commission, which concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald had acted alone.

McCone later said he failed to disclose his agencies plots to kill Cuban dictator Fidel Castro to the Warren investigation because he didn’t know about them at the time. The CIA’s internal report, though, concludes that McCone was lying about that. Even some of the commission investigators felt their lack of knowledge about that program compromised their probe.

According to an article in Politico.com by Philip Shenon, McCone also hid knowledge that the agency monitored Oswald’s mail and perhaps had direct contact with him before the assassination.

In one sense, the CIA’s report, quietly declassified last fall, could be seen as another step toward resolving questions about JFK’s death. But it’s an odd way to attempt to silence the doubters. Shenon, author of "A Cruel and Shocking Act," a history of the Warren investigation, notes "there are 15 places in the public version of the report where the CIA has deleted sensitive information – sometimes individual names, sometimes whole sentences. It is an acknowledgement, it seems, that there are still secrets about the Kennedy assassination hidden in the agency’s files."