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The Journal Gazette

Monday, June 10, 2019 1:00 am

Letters

Making a difference through value of one

Recently I noticed a lady walking into a neighborhood store. Before reaching the door, she scooped up several pieces of litter and dropped them in a trash can outside the entrance. It took an extra minute, an extra ounce of care for her neighborhood.

What is the value of one that you could enact? Take a reusable bag shopping? Great! Group your errands in a loop and conserve fuel? Awesome! Walk or bike to the store? Fantastic! Recycle? Wonderful!

The value of each one of us starts with caring about the Lord's creation we share. It marries that care to an action. Together these actions reduce waste and allow us to enjoy a cleaner community. Possibly you could work with a child, grandchild or neighbor. What is your value of one?

Gretchen Weerts

New Haven

IU Health can do better on female representation

The photos in an advertisement for the new office of IU Health Physicians of Fort Wayne (in the June 2 Journal Gazette) indicated that only one of nine physicians there is a woman (11%).

Meanwhile, more than half (51%) of all medical students are women, both at IU Medical School and in the U.S. A total of 60% of all physicians younger than 35 are women.

Not only would IU Health benefit from a greater representation of women physicians in their practice, many of their patients would prefer women physicians.

With that large percentage of women in the number of physicians, IU Health can easily do better.

Robert B. Pettit

Fort Wayne

Story serves as reminder of how society has fallen

Sadness enveloped me while reading the article “Parents file lawsuit over daughter's bullying (May 31)” and reading that the autistic 14-year-old special needs student had been bullied by her classmates to the point of attempting suicide because she “believed going to heaven would cure her autism.”

It was bad enough that she was verbally abused, but also received threats of physical assault.

I got a lump in my throat while reading the taunts: “You should die.” “Dig a hole and bury yourself.” “Die of cancer, die in a fiery crash.” “Her mother was a fool to love her.”

The last, most hurtful taunt is surely a reflection of today's society and lack of respect for human life.

By dehumanizing a baby in the womb who might have a sickness and with the law allowing the mother to abort the baby just because they might be sick, might be disabled, a boy, a girl, a different race than she wants or just for being inconvenient – maybe we shouldn't really blame the classmates for their lack of respect.

Instead, maybe we should blame ourselves for not speaking out and being more bold about protecting our precious babies who are in danger of being aborted. Respect starts here or every evil act will follow, and this hateful act is only one small example of where our society has drifted.

Pray that by our example, the younger generation grows to respect all life, especially that of a special needs student who just wants to fit into society.

Shelley Pulver

Angola

Warming no 'new thing'

I believe the world makes too big of a deal out of global warming. To me, it seems like an excuse for all the problems in science. I'm not saying I don't believe global warming exists, just that it happens every so often in the history of time, making it not a new thing.

Noah Warner

Roanoke