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The Journal Gazette

Tuesday, July 02, 2019 1:00 am

Letters

Voucher school charade draining tax dollars

I want to commend The Journal Gazette for its editorial “Voucher accountability charade,” regarding Horizon Christian Academy's consistent abuse of Indiana's expanding voucher program.

While it is disturbing, to say the least, that publicly funded voucher schools and those who run them seem immune from oversight – and that abuse seems to go unchecked – it was especially alarming to discover that Horizon's two unlicensed administrators, Tammy Henline and Anthony Beasley, earned six-figure salaries totaling more than $489,000 for overseeing a failing school.

But failure has not deterred Henline, as she has left Horizon to start yet another faith-based program “relying heavily on a virtual curriculum” that is seeking accreditation to receive more voucher dollars.

Vouchers continue to strip Southwest Allen County, East Allen County, Northwest Allen County and Fort Wayne Community Schools of valuable resources. And our public-school teachers are required to meet a growing list of standards to serve all students, not just the ones they choose to serve, or those who share their religious beliefs.

It's time for the people who want less government and government spending to step up. Let's demand the state stop funneling tax dollars to the likes of Henline and Beasley for their failing schools and giant salaries.

What a charade, indeed.

Molly Papier

Fort Wayne

 

Defense budget not set to face greatest enemy

Many innovations were developed through national defense funding. However, the 2020 National Defense Authorization Act is facing our greatest enemy ever, the climate crisis.

Rep. Jim Banks of the 3rd District was seen mostly twiddling his thumbs texting, rather than building consensus, during the House Armed Services Committee hearings for a defense budget. Banks supports increased spending on an arms race instead of protecting us from the existential threat of greenhouse gases.

Here are a few things Congress could invest in with our military tax dollars to combat climate chaos. Instead of hypersonic missiles, develop lightweight materials for windmills and solar panels. Instead of building more naval battle ships, convert a strategic fleet for cleaning plastics out of the oceans. Contribute to international climate management programs.

It is not hard to imagine other conversions of war planning into an economy built around saving ecosystems and sequestering carbon. We could aim the genius of our defense contract engineers to redevelop our railroad and highway corridors into safer, efficient public transportation free from fossil fuels.

Morton Marcus, former director of the Indiana University Kelley School of Business, explained this lack of economic progress in a recent newspaper column. We are “...strangled by suburban politicians drunk on the power they derive from their narcissistic fiefdoms.” And, they twiddle while the world burns.

Howard Traxmor

Fort Wayne 

 

Broadly speaking, paper misused tech terms

Regarding the article about broadband in Indiana (June 23), the term is “megabits” not “microbits.” “Mega” refers to million, “gigabit” refers to billions and then there is “terabit,” which refers to trillions. All this is readily available on a network known as the internet. I would be glad to tutor the staff concerning the technology.

Jeff Ott

South Whitley