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The Journal Gazette

Wednesday, September 12, 2018 1:00 am

BRIEFS

NHL in mediation over concussion suit

Staff, news services

BUFFALO, N.Y. – NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman downplayed the significance of entering mediation with former players in a bid to settle a concussion lawsuit, saying Tuesday the league is simply following a judge's order.

“The judge asked us to go into mediation and so we're complying with the judge's request,” Bettman told The Associated Press.

He said he had nothing to add when asked if there has been progress and reiterated the NHL's position on the lawsuit, saying: “We also think the lawsuit doesn't have merit.”

Bettman spoke to the AP while attending the NHL officials training camp in Buffalo.

Stuart Davidson, one of the attorneys representing the players, disputed Bettman's assertion on the merits of the lawsuit, while confirming the two sides were asked to enter mediation by U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson in Minnesota.

“While we obviously disagree with the Commissioner's views on the merits of these important cases, and continue to work very hard to obtain justice for our clients, the commissioner is correct that Judge Nelson requested that the parties try to work out their differences with a mediator, if they are able,” Davidson wrote in an email.

More than 100 former players are part of the lawsuit in accusing the NHL of failing to better prevent head trauma or warn players of such risks while promoting violent play that led to their injuries.

Colleges

Tech coach wins wrestling honor

Indiana Tech assistant coach Gralan Early was named youth coach of the year by the Indiana State Wrestling Association on Sunday. Early, a North Side grad, has mentored Indiana Tech wrestlers since the program began in 2011. He has also coached for eight years with the Warrior Elite Wrestling Club, and in recent summers has coached the Indiana Cadet National Duals team in Spokane, Washington, and the Indiana Junior/Cadet National Team in Fargo, North Dakota.

MSU covered up Nassar rape: Suit

A woman filed a lawsuit against Michigan State University, saying she became pregnant after she was drugged and raped by Larry Nassar when he was a medical student in 1992 but that campus police refused to investigate. The lawsuit was among dozens filed to meet a Monday deadline for legal claims against Michigan State, although the complaint might be too old to qualify for a share of $75 million set aside by the university for victims who aren't part of a larger $425 million settlement. Nassar, 55, became a sports doctor at MSU and for elite U.S. gymnasts but now is in prison for child pornography crimes and molesting female athletes with his hands. The woman said she had a knee injury as a 17-year-old field hockey player and was encouraged to go to Nassar in 1992. She said she became pregnant and had a miscarriage. George Perles, who was athletic director until spring 1992, was aware of the assault and covered it up, and campus police wouldn't pursue it, according to the lawsuit. Perles also was football coach at the time and now is a member of the school's governing board.

Football

Stanford's Love to sit out game

All-America running back Bryce Love will miss No. 9 Stanford's game against UC Davis on Saturday with an injury. Cardinal coach David Shaw would not disclose specifics about Love's injury. Love was the Heisman Trophy runner-up last season after running for 2,118 yards. He had 126 yards on 22 carries last week in a victory against Southern California after being held to 29 yards by San Diego State in the opener.

Texas A&M now most valuable

Texas A&M has supplanted Texas as America's most valuable college football program. Forbes magazine released its list of most valuable college football programs based on estimate averages for profits and revenue for the 2014, '15 and '16 seasons. Texas had held the top spot, drawing $100 million in revenue in 2011 and $92 million in profit alone in 2014. A&M's rise was attributed to an increase in athletic department contributions, along more ticket revenue and conference revenue from the Southeastern Conference. Texas A&M brought in $148 million in revenue and made $107 million in profit, according to Forbes' estimates. Texas made $133 million in revenue and $87 million in profit, while Michigan was third at $127 million and $75  million. Alabama and Ohio State round out the top five.

Tennis

Serena's umpire at Davis Cup

The chair umpire who penalized Serena Williams a game in the U.S. Open final has been assigned to officiate the Davis Cup semifinal matches between the United States and Croatia. International Tennis Federation spokeswoman Heather Bowles confirmed that Carlos Ramos was chosen to work at the best-of-five series between the countries that begins Friday and concludes Sunday in Zadar, Croatia. The U.S. team includes Jack Sock, Sam Querrey, Steve Johnson, Mike Bryan and rookie Frances Tiafoe.