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Friday, January 21, 2022 2:00 pm

Yemeni rebels say Saudi-led airstrike on prison killed 70

JON GAMBRELL and MAAD AL-ZIKRY | Associated Press

 

SANAA, Yemen -- A Saudi-led airstrike targeting a prison run by Yemen's Houthi rebels killed at least 70 detainees and wounded dozens Friday, a rebel minister said.

The strike was part of a pounding aerial offensive that hours earlier took the Arab world's poorest country off the internet.

The intense campaign comes after the Iran-backed Houthis claimed a drone and missile attack that struck inside the capital of the United Arab Emirates earlier in the week.

It marked a major escalation in the conflict, a brutal civil war in Yemen where the Saudi-led coalition, backed by the UAE, has battled the rebels since 2015.

Taha al-Motawakel, health minister in the Houthi government which controls the country's north, told the Associated Press in the capital, Sanaa, that 70 detainees were killed at the prison but that he expects the number to rise in the coming hours since many of the wounded were seriously hurt.

Earlier Friday, a Saudi-led airstrike in the port city of Hodeida -- later confirmed by satellite photos analyzed by the AP -- hit a telecommunication center there that's key to Yemen's connection to the internet. Airstrikes also hit near Sanaa, held by the Houthis since late 2014.

Basheer Omar, an International Committee of the Red Cross spokesperson in Yemen, said rescuers continued to go through the rebel-run prison site in the northern city of Saada.

“The toll is likely to increase, unfortunately," Omar said.

The Red Cross had moved some of the wounded to facilities elsewhere, he said. He had no breakdown for how many were killed and how many were wounded.

Doctors Without Borders in a separate statement put the number of wounded alone at around 200 people.

“From what I hear from my colleague in Saada, there are many bodies still at the scene of the airstrike, many missing people,” said Ahmed Mahat, the organization's head of mission in Yemen. “It seems to have been a horrific act of violence.”

The organization Save the Children earlier said more than 60 were killed in Saada, describing the prison holding detained migrants.

“The initial casualties report from Saada is horrifying,” said Gillian Moyes, Save the Children's country director in Yemen. “Migrants seeking better lives for themselves and their families, Yemeni civilians injured by the dozens, is a picture we never hoped to wake up to in Yemen.”

As for the airstrike in Hodeida, NetBlocks said the internet disruption began around 1 a.m. local and affected TeleYemen, the state-owned monopoly that controls internet access in the country. TeleYemen is now run by the Houthis who have held Yemen's capital, Sanaa, since late 2014.

Yemen faces “a nation-scale collapse of internet connectivity" after an airstrike on a telecommunications building, NetBlocks said.

The San Diego-based Center for Applied Internet Data Analysis and San Francisco-based internet firm CloudFlare also noted a nationwide outage affecting Yemen beginning around the same time.

More than 12 hours later, the internet remained down. The Norwegian Refugee Council decried the strike as “a blatant attack on civilian infrastructure that will also impact our aid delivery.”

The Houthi's Al-Masirah satellite news channel said the strike on the telecommunications building killed and wounded an unspecified number of people. It released chaotic footage of people digging through rubble for a body as gunshots could be heard. Aid workers assisted bloodied survivors.

Save the Children said the Hodeida strike killed at least three children playing on a soccer field. Satellite photos analyzed by the AP corresponded to photos shared on social media of the telecommunications building being flattened by the airstrike.

The Saudi-led coalition acknowledged carrying out “accurate airstrikes to destroy the capabilities of the militia” around Hodeida's port. It didn't immediately acknowledge striking a telecommunication target as NetBlocks described, but instead called Hodeida a hub for piracy and Iranian arms smuggling to back the Houthis.

Iran has denied arming the Houthis, though U.N. experts, independent analysts and Western countries point to evidence showing Iran’s link to the weapons.

 

Gambrell reported from Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Edith M. Lederer of the Associated Press at the United Nations contributed to this story.

 

   

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